1. millennialau:

    We need you to donate to the bail fund. Cops want it depleted. Make sure it’s not!

  2. notyourexrotic:


This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZPhoto credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

    notyourexrotic:

    This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

    The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

    In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

    This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

    To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

    Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

    - A Mighty Girl

  3. iwriteaboutfeminism:

    Today, Ferguson is prepared to “keep it moving.”

    September 28th

  4. Raising Most People’s Wages

    robertreich:

    I was in Seattle, Washington, recently, to congratulate union and community organizers who helped Seattle enact the first $15 per hour minimum wage in the country.

    Other cities and states should follow Seattle’s example.

    Contrary to the dire predictions of opponents, the hike won’t cost Seattle jobs. In fact, it will put more money into the hands of low-wage workers who are likely to spend almost all of it in the vicinity. That will create jobs.

    Conservatives believe the economy functions better if the rich have more money and everyone else has less. But they’re wrong. It’s just the opposite. 

    The real job creators are not CEOs or corporations or wealthy investors. The job creators are members of America’s vast middle class and the poor, whose purchases cause businesses to expand and invest. 

    America’s wealthy are richer than they’ve ever been. Big corporations are sitting on more cash they know what to do with. Corporate profits are at record levels. CEO pay continues to soar.

    But the wealthy aren’t investing in new companies. Between 1980 and 2014, the rate of new business formation in the United States dropped by half, according to a Brookings study released in May.

    Corporations aren’t expanding production or investing in research and development. Instead, they’re using their money to buy back their shares of stock.

    There’s no reason for them to expand or invest if customers aren’t buying.

    Consumer spending has grown more slowly in this recovery than in any previous one because consumers don’t have enough money to buy. 

    All the economic gains have been going to the top.

    The Commerce Department reported last Friday that the economy grew at a 4.6 percent annual rate in the second quarter of the year.

    So what? The median household’s income continues to drop.

    Median household income is now 8 percent below what it was in 2007, adjusted for inflation. It’s 11 percent below its level in 2000.

    It used to be that economic expansions improved the incomes of the bottom 90 percent more than the top 10 percent.

    But starting with the “Reagan” recovery of 1982 to 1990, the benefits of economic growth during expansions have gone mostly to the top 10 percent.

    Since the current recovery began in 2009, all economic gains have gone to the top 10 percent. The bottom 90 percent has lost ground.

    We’re in the first economic upturn on record in which 90 percent of Americans have become worse off.

    Why did the playing field start to tilt against the middle class in the Reagan recovery, and why has it tilted further ever since?

    Don’t blame globalization. Other advanced nations facing the same global competition have managed to preserve middle class wages. Germany’s median wage is now higher than America’s.

    One factor here has been a sharp decline in union membership. In the mid 1970s, 25 percent of the private-sector workforce was unionized.

    Then came the Reagan revolution. By the end of the 1980s, only 17 percent of the private workforce was unionized. Today, fewer than 7 percent of the nation’s private-sector workers belong to a union.

    This means most workers no longer have the bargaining power to get a share of the gains from growth.

    Another structural change is the drop in the minimum wage. In 1979, it was $9.67 an hour (in 2013 dollars). By 1990, it had declined to $6.84. Today it’s $7.25, well below where it was in 1979.

    Given that workers are far more productive now – computers have even increased the output of retail and fast food workers — the minimum wage should be even higher.

    By setting a floor on wages, a higher minimum helps push up other wages. It undergirds higher median household incomes.

    The only way to grow the economy in a way that benefits the bottom 90 percent is to change the structure of the economy. At the least, this requires stronger unions and a higher minimum wage.

    It also requires better schools for the children of the bottom 90 percent, better access to higher education, and a more progressive tax system.

    GDP growth is less and less relevant to the wellbeing of most Americans. We should be paying less attention to growth and more to median household income.

    If the median household’s income is is heading upward, the economy is in good shape. If it’s heading downward, as it’s been for this entire recovery, we’re all in deep trouble.

  5. medschoolapplicant:

    Today I’m wearing a nice dark shade of exhaustion under my eyes.

  6. moonblossom:

My dash did the thing, and it was good

    moonblossom:

    My dash did the thing, and it was good

  7. I’m totally an adult

    The true connoisseurs among you will be unsurprised to note that celery & peanut butter do not pair particularly well with red wine. Even cheap red wine.  

    Just FYI. 

  8. socialjusticekoolaid:

    Today in Solidarity (9.27.14): The Lost Voices campground since Mike Brown’s murder was ransacked by police… so petty. #staywoke #farfromover

    Don’t know who the Lost Voices are yet? They’re the youth brigade on the frontlines of Ferguson, leading the fight for justice for Mike Brown. (Many of those tweets you see on my posts are from LV.) Yesterday, their campsite was raided without notice. These young leaders have been under constant attack from police since protests began, but yesterday was a clear intimidation move. Well guess what— Lost Voices will not be intimidated or stopped.  Please make sure you’re showing them your love and support. Consider donating to their efforts today. 

  9. naturee-feels:

    mangoestho:

    Pete Marovich, Shaddows of the Gullah Geechee

    precious

  10. (Source: jamsradio)

  11. me when I go anywhere

    me: ugh there are people here

  12. iwriteaboutfeminism:

    The overwhelming injustice of John Crawford’s murder. 

  13. lamardeuse:

    johanirae:

    iwriteaboutfeminism:

    Protesters are angry about these strange negotiations to release protesters. What kind of practice is this?

    September 28th

    When police start using terrorist hijacker tactics… WTF

    Wow. The DoJ needs to come in and start that whole fucking police force all over again, from the ground up.

  14. micdotcom:

    35 intense photos capture protesters’ struggle for Democracy in Hong Kong

    Follow micdotcom 

  15. millennialau:

    Reporting of incident where this man fucking forcibly ran into @bdoulaoblongata with his walker while saying he is Darren Wilson. Protestors were protesting this location because owner stopped allowing black patrons to enter, only white patrons and pulled a gun out on protestors.

    Video clips of him allowing white patrons only and locking door to come.